BA Philosophy and Sociology allows you to both critically engage with some of the deepest questions human beings have asked across history, while at the same time understand the challenges and opportunities of contemporary society. 

From the ethics of killing to the impact of the media, this combined degree allows you to explore human life as both a philosopher and a social scientist, offering a challenging but unique perspective into human behaviour, morality and society.

At Newcastle, you will have access to world-class Philosophy talent in fields as diverse as metaphysics, philosophy of psychiatry, epistemology, ethics, philosophy of religion and philosophy of mind. Meanwhile, the Sociology side of your course will allow you to explore the dynamic, unprecedented social changes reshaping the world today and help you understand how social relations and structures influence all aspects of our lives. 

  

Why Study this Course?

  • Great reputation – The Department of Philosophy is ranked in the Top 5 in The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2019. This is the fourth consecutive year that we have been ranked in the Top 5.
  • Taught by experts – You will study alongside some of the finest minds in Philosophy and Sociology. Times Higher Education ranked the Department of Philosophy 2nd in the country for its performance in the latest Research Excellence Framework exercise. 
  • Outstanding student experience – You will have a variety of opportunities to enhance your student experience, including regular coffee mornings for staff and students, visiting speakers and specialist lectures, student conferences, research visits and a variety of trips.
  • Fantastic module variety – The amount of optional modules on offer will allow you to specialise more as you progress so that you can study areas of the discipline that interest you most.
  • Space to think – Philosophers write works that closely resemble essays, so essays are for the most part the best method of assessment. With this in mind, almost all of our Philosophy assessments are based on coursework. Staff within the Department of Philosophy know students by name and are always happy to talk about philosophical questions or provide additional feedback on academic performance. 

Institutional Accreditation 

Regional accreditation is an institution-level accreditation status granted by one of six U.S. regional accrediting bodies. Accreditation by more than one regional accrediting body is not permitted by the U.S. Department of Education.

University of Newcastle is accredited by the DETC Higher Learning Commission (DETC), www.detc.org.uk Since , University of Newcastle has been continually accredited by the DETC Higher Learning Commission and its predecessor.

BA Philosophy and Sociology

Course Level:

Undergraduate, Joint Honours combined

Credits 

120

Course

CODE U531

How long it takes:

Undergraduate (3 Years)

Study Mode:

Distance learning/ Campus

Course cost

Price: US$20,220

Entry requirements

Find out more about

Department:

Newcastle Law School

Joint Honours flexibility

Every degree programme at the University is divided into 120 credits of study for each year of the programme. In the first year of a Joint Honours programme, you will study 60 credits in each subject as you learn the core elements of the disciplines. We recognise that students on Joint Honours programmes might come to favour one subject slightly more than another. To account for this, we have added more flexibility into the second and final years of our programmes. In the second year, you can stick with the 60-60 split between the two subjects or shift to a 80-40 credit weighting, effectively a major/ minor combination. You can either go back to 60-60 in the final year, maintain the same 80-40 split or reverse the major and the minor and go to a 40-80 weighting.

 

Year 1

Philosophy compulsory modules

  • Problems of Philosophy (20)
  • The Philosopher’s Toolkit (20)

 

Sociology compulsory modules

  • The Sociological Imagination (20)
  • Social Research I (20)
  • Introduction to Social Divisions (20)

  

Year 2

Sociology compulsory modules

  • Modern Sociology Theory (20)
  • Social Research  II (20)

Optional module examples:

  • Self and Society
  • Media and Society
  • Global Societies
  • Disability and Social Policy
  • Comparative Social Policy
  • Managing Health and Social Care
  • Terror, Threat and Security
  • Punishment in a Global Context
  • Global Education: Issues, Opportunities, Futures
  • Education, Policy and Social Justice
  • Housing and Communities

     

Year abroad

You can apply to study abroad for a year in an approved university around the world. If you achieve a grade of 2.1 or above in your first year then you will be invited to apply for a Year Abroad in your second year. If your application is successful, you will go abroad in your third year and return to us for your final year.

  

Final Year

Philosophy compulsory modules

  • 80 credits – Philosophical Project (20 or 40)
  • 60 credits –  Philosophical Project (20 or 40)

 

Sociology compulsory modules

  • 80 credits – Dissertation (40) and Contemporary Social Theory (20)
  • 60 credits –  Dissertation (40 – if not taken in Philosophy) and Contemporary Social Theory (20)
  • 40 credits – Contemporary Social Theory (20)

Optional module examples:

  • Political Sociology
  • Technology and Society
  • ‘Freedom’, Control and Critique
  • Sociology of Success and Fame
  • Sociology of Film
  • Migration and Super Diversity
  • Your Money and Your Life
  • Harmful Societies
  • Sociology of Personal Life
  • Divided Publics
  • Doing or Not Doing God? Religion, Policy and Politics
  • Crime and the City
  • Sociology of Health and Illness
  • Children as Citizens
  • Gender and Education
  • Quantitave Analysis I and Quantitave Analysis II
  • Prospects for Social Policy in the UK
  • Professional Development Module

Entry requirements

 

Applicants should normally have one of the following:

  • A non-law bachelor’s degree (from a UK university or recognised by the BSB if you wish to study the BPTC), or
  • A ‘stale’ law degree, where five or more years have elapsed since graduation, or
  • An academic or professional qualification at degree equivalent level

If English is not your first language, you will also need to demonstrate your English Language proficiency. For example, you should have IELTS 7.5 overall with a minimum of 6.5 in all components.

If you intend to become a Solicitor

The Solicitors Regulation Authority has reduced its requirements for pre-authorisation this year. For details of the current arrangements, see the SRA website. You should pay special attention to the Character and Suitability section. If you think you may have a character or suitability issue, you may wish to clarify with the SRA before proceeding with the GDL.

See further details of our English Language requirement

USA,UK & EU students, 2019/20 (per year)

£8,500

International students starting 2019/20 (per year)

£13,100

 

Assessment

You’ll show your progress through a combination of written essays, problem-solving assignments and presentations.

All students take our core modules, but please note that the availability of optional modules is subject to demand.

By studying a Philosophy and Sociology degree at the University of Newcastle , you will acquire skills highly sought after by employers within the graduate job market:

  • Understanding complex information
  • Writing clearly and effectively
  • Building a case to critically assess a particular point of view
  • Respecting the views of others even if they disagree with you
  • Independent thought
  • Ability to communicate, and knowledge of, social issues in private and public sectors
  • Strong and evidenced training in research methods

Our graduates have excellent employment prospects with over 88% of Philosophy and Sociology graduates entering work or further study within six months of graduation .

Philosophy and Sociology graduates go on to pursue highly successful careers in professions such as:

  • Law
  • Journalism
  • Teaching
  • Management consultancy
  • Local government
  • Publishing
  • Marketing
  • Social Research
  • Media
  • Policy Development
  • Charity

 

Developing your career

Employers target University of Newcastle students for their diverse skill-set and our graduate employment statistics have continued to climb at a rate well above national trends. If you make the most of our wide range of opportunities you will be able to develop your career from the moment you arrive.

  • Careers events – we hold events covering careers in teaching, event management, marketing and working with charities to help you meet potential employers and learn more about these sectors.
  • Global Challenge – you can apply to work overseas on an expenses-paid placement during your summer vacation through our Global Challenge initiative.
  • Work experience bursary – we encourage you to apply your skills in the workplace by undertaking internships in the summer. Our work experience bursaries allow you to apply for funding to support you during unpaid internships.
  • Cultural Internships – our innovative Cultural Internships offer graduates the opportunity for a six month paid internship at a leading cultural institution in the West Midlands. These internships will give you professional experience to set you apart in a competitive graduate market. Our current partners include Newcastle Museums and Art Gallery, Newcastle REP, Newcastle Royal Ballet, City of Newcastle Symphony Orchestra, Ironbridge Gorge Museums Trust, Library of Newcastle .

There are also internships available at our own cultural assets, such as Winterbourne House, the Lapworth Museum, and the Barber Institute of Fine Arts.