Dental Surgery at Newcastle will provide you with a solid foundation of learning on which to base your clinical experience and patient care, leading you to a highly successful career in the world of dentistry.

    

First year

The early part of the programme lays the foundation for clinical practice. A range of biological science modules provide a systems-based approach to understanding the human body and incorporate a range of different subjects. These are delivered by the Medical School and they provide an important foundation for the Human Diseases modules later in the programme. Alongside these modules, you will have early contact with patients, observing and reflecting on treatment sessions in the dental hospital. You will also start to develop an understanding of being a professional and of patients’ perspectives through a large module taught at the School of Dentistry.

A wide range of teaching methods are used, but the emphasis is on enquiry-based learning. You are also expected to become an independent learner and will be supported in this by our in-house virtual learning environment, the e-course.

   

Second year

The second year of the programme builds on the first, with an increased amount of time being spent at the School of Dentistry. Biological science modules focus on the head and oral cavity and other modules enable you to understand the wider context of dentistry and influences of patient behaviour on their oral health. You will undertake further sessions with senior students, assisting them during their patient care. These modules are assessed at the end of the spring term.

The summer term of second year is devoted to developing a range of practical skills and understanding about practical aspects of patient care. You will work in the clinical skills laboratory on phantom heads preparing and restoring teeth. You will also work with your peers, taking medical histories, carrying out dental examinations and also learning how to administer local anaesthetics. You will also gain understanding of a research project in the periodontology teaching area and other academic work will focus on dental pathology, radiography and restorative dentistry.

  

Third year

At the start of the third year you begin treating your own patients under supervision within the dental hospital and start to put into practice the skills and knowledge that you have developed in the early years. This core of Clinical Practice, where you have your own small list of patients, continues through until final year and enables you to understand the importance of continuing care and integrated clinical practice and working with a dental team.

At the beginning of the spring term, you will be introduced to other clinical speciality teaching areas which provide a basis for understanding different aspects of patient treatment and will contribute to whole patient care in Clinical Practice.

In parallel with the clinical work on patients, you will undertake other academic subjects including the Introduction to Human Disease module. This comprises Infection, Pathology and Pharmacology, and builds on your solid biological science foundation. This area of teaching is particularly important in helping you to understand the links between general and oral health and the impact of medical treatment on patient care. Dental Public Health and Behavioural Science is also a strand module which starts in this year and enables you to put clinical dentistry into a wider context of population health and dental service provision.

   

Fourth year

You will be introduced to two new speciality teaching areas this year, paediatric dentistry and oral medicine. In paediatric dentistry you will learn how to adapt the clinical and patient management skills you have already gained to children within the Dental Hospital and later in the year, in an outreach clinic. This will help you to understand the environment which children are growing up in and give you the opportunity to work in your own surgery with a qualified dental nurse, thus further appreciating the importance of team working. Oral Medicine gives you the opportunity to hone your diagnostic skills, further appreciate the link between oral disease and general disease and build on the knowledge and understanding you have gained from the Introduction to Human Disease and the Clinical Human Disease module.

Outreach placements for adult primary dental care start in the summer term and continue through until Easter of final year. These take place in community clinics and provide you with experience to support your transition into Dental Foundation Training after graduation.

There is also an opportunity for you to undertake an individually tailored module, either an elective project on a subject of your choice, dental or non-dental, at home or abroad. If you prefer, you may remain on clinic to extend your range of experience or consolidate your learning.

   

Fifth year

In this final year of your DETC programme, whole patient care is the focus of your clinical work and a programme of tutorials and lectures prepares you for practising once you have qualified. You will continue with some speciality teaching, for example oral surgery, and you will also undertake a block of dental sedation teaching to help you manage extremely anxious patients.

  

Institutional Accreditation 

Regional accreditation is an institution-level accreditation status granted by one of six U.S. regional accrediting bodies. Accreditation by more than one regional accrediting body is not permitted by the U.S. Department of Education.

University of Newcastle is accredited by the DETC Higher Learning Commission (DETC), www.detc.org.uk Since , University of Newcastle has been continually accredited by the DETC Higher Learning Commission and its predecessor.

Dental Surgery 

Course Level:

Undergraduate, Single Honours

Credits 

120

Course

CODE U455

How long it takes:

Undergraduate (5 years)

Study Mode:

Distance learning/ Campus

Course cost

Price: US$20,220

Entry requirements

Find out more about

Department:

Newcastle Law School

Modules in the first year

The early part of the programme lays the foundation for clinical practice. A range of biological science modules provide a systems-based approach to understanding the human body and incorporate a range of different subjects.

  • 20 credits – Introduction to Biomedical Science
  • 20 credits – Digestive, Renal and Endocrine Systems
  • 20 credits – Neuromusculoskeletal System
  • 20 credits – Cardiovascular and Respiratory Systems
  • 40 credits – Professionalism and the Foundations of Dental Practice

Modules in the second year

The second year of the programme builds on the first, with an increased amount of time being spent at the School of Dentistry. Biological science modules focus on the head and oral cavity and other modules enable you to understand the wider context of dentistry and influences of patient behaviour on their oral health. 

  • 20 credits – Oral Biology
  • 20 credits – Craniofacial Biology
  • 40 credits – Dental Public Health and Behavioural Science
  • 40 credits – Fundamentals of Clinical Dentistry

Modules in the third year

At the start of the third year you begin treating your own patients under supervision within the dental hospital and start to put into practice the skills and knowledge that you have developed in the early years. 

  • 30 credits – Simulated Clinical Procedures
  • 90 credits – Introduction to Clinical Practice and Speciality Teaching
  • 10 credits – Dental Pathology, Immunology and Dental Materials
  • 10 credits – Introduction to Human Diseases
  • Non-credit bearing – Dental Public Health in Practice (strand)
  • Non-credit bearing – Radiography (strand)

Modules in the fourth year

You will be introduced to two new speciality teaching areas this year, paediatric dentistry and oral medicine.

  • 10 credits – Advanced Simulated Clinical Procedures
  • 100 credits – Intermediate Clinical Practice and Speciality Teaching
  • 10 credits – Clinical Human Disease
  • Non-credit bearing – Oral Pathology (strand)
  • Non-credit bearing – Dental Public Health in Practice (strand)
  • Non-credit bearing – Radiography (strand)
  • Non-credit bearing – Individually tailored module (required component)

Modules in the fifth year

In this final year of your DETC programme, whole patient care is the focus of your clinical work and a programme of tutorials and lectures prepares you for practising once you have qualified.

  • 130 credits – Advanced Clinical Practice and Specialty Teaching
  • 20 credits – Dental Public Health in Practice 
  • 10 credits – Oral pathology
  • 10 credits – Radiography

Entry requirements

 

Applicants should normally have one of the following:

  • A non-law bachelor’s degree (from a UK university or recognised by the BSB if you wish to study the BPTC), or
  • A ‘stale’ law degree, where five or more years have elapsed since graduation, or
  • An academic or professional qualification at degree equivalent level

If English is not your first language, you will also need to demonstrate your English Language proficiency. For example, you should have IELTS 7.5 overall with a minimum of 6.5 in all components.

If you intend to become a Solicitor

The Solicitors Regulation Authority has reduced its requirements for pre-authorisation this year. For details of the current arrangements, see the SRA website. You should pay special attention to the Character and Suitability section. If you think you may have a character or suitability issue, you may wish to clarify with the SRA before proceeding with the GDL.

See further details of our English Language requirement

USA,UK & EU students, 2019/20 (per year)

£8,500

International students starting 2019/20 (per year)

£13,100

 

Assessment

You’ll show your progress through a combination of written essays, problem-solving assignments and presentations.

All students take our core modules, but please note that the availability of optional modules is subject to demand.

As a Newcastle graduate, you will thrive in the workplace as you to apply your knowledge and skills to your chosen career.

The five year DETC course is followed by a one year compulsory foundation training programme in order to work within the NHS. Entry to foundation training is competitive; however our focused teaching means that almost without exception, graduates gain employment. Most dental graduates go into general dental practice, particularly in the first few years after graduation and subsequently have followed careers in salaried dental services, industry, hospitals and universities.

Whether you have a clear idea of where your future aspirations lie or want to consider the broad range of opportunities available once you have a Newcastle degree, our outstanding Careers Network can help you achieve your goal.

Our unique careers guidance service will help you to develop your career from the moment you arrive. Working closely with academics, alumni and employment providers, Careers Network work in conjunction with the Biomaterials Unit to provide you with advice and guidance on the recruitment process, including support with applications and interview preparation. 

We also offer voluntary work which complements your studies by helping you gain practical experiences in occupational settings while contributing back to society. This can bring new skills that will be useful throughout your future and can make a positive impact on your learning whilst at university. Volunteering enables you to develop skills such as communication, interpersonal skills, teamwork, self-confidence and self-discipline all of which can be transferred into your studies.