Newcastle MBChB is a degree where heritage meets ground-breaking innovation: we create the knowledge and we deliver it. In addition to our five-year Medicine and Surgery MBChB programme, we have the four-year MBChB for graduates with a first degree in a life science.

At Newcastle Medical School you will learn from passionate researchers, academics and clinicians in world-class settings with a focus on hand-on, apprentice-style experience. You’ll learn alongside other health professions for the most comprehensive, real life, learning experience and have the unique opportunity to see a vast range of illness, learning from a diverse population of over five million people. Newcastle is also home to some of the UK’s leading hospitals, including the Queen Elizabeth Hospital right next door.

This four-year degree programme is designed specifically for graduates and is an excellent opportunity to develop the skills you need to become a medical practitioner. Right from the start, you’ll experience the practice of healthcare in the community with an attachment to a general practice, allowing you to see how your studies translate into clinical practice.

With a strong community feel and award winning student medical society at its heart, at Newcastle Medical School we support you throughout your studies. Benefitting from some of the best clinical education settings in Europe, you will graduate as a smart, practical, compassionate, safe and ethical doctor, renowned for your professionalism and communication skills and excelling at making a difference to other people’s lives.

We know that constant change and innovation are crucial to stay relevant and meet the challenges of a rapidly evolving NHS and that’s why Newcastle Medical School is proud to produce the doctors of the future. 

We consider applications from Home/EU students only. We also offer a three-year training programme for qualified dentists wishing to pursue a career in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Further information is given within the course details tab under ‘entry requirements’.

  

First year 

This phase begins with a programme covering biological sciences, anatomy and medicine in society, since you will have covered little of these in comparison with your knowledge of other life science subjects. You’ll work on problem-based case studies as part of a tutor-supervised group of about eight students, with each of you covering all aspects of the case studies. The problems are grouped into four six-week themed blocks covering basic science, anatomy (including prosection), ethics, medicine in society and behavioural science, with all these aspects integrated into each of the case studies.

Second year 

You will be based in the same Teaching Hospital Trusts that currently teach the third-year course for students on the five-year MBChB, spending the first semester in one teaching Trust and rotating to another in the second. You’ll also join our five-year MBChB students in their clinical science lectures, pharmacology teaching and special study modules in public health and epidemiology. In addition, as a GEC student you’ll continue with a small component of case-based learning to further your basic and behavioural science training. 

Students on the Maxillofacial Surgery training programme will commence their studies at this stage.

Third and fourth years

You will now move onto clinical attachments with attachments in medical, surgical and other speciality subjects, such as cardiology, neurology, psychiatry, bone and joint disease, oncology, ear, nose and throat and peri-operative care. Further attachments will cover obstetrics and gynaecology, paediatrics and general practice. During your final year, you will be able to bring all of your learning and skills together through the Acutely Ill Patient attachment, which prepares you for dealing with the range of problems that you will encounter as a Foundation Doctor. 

During your third year, you will spend one month full-time on an elective placement where you can choose what you study and where. This could involve undertaking your own clinical research either at Newcastle Medical School, another centre in the UK or abroad, in a clinical setting (primary or secondary care), other healthcare setting or in a laboratory. Many of our students choose to undertake their elective abroad to experience a healthcare system in a different cultural context.

Institutional Accreditation 

Regional accreditation is an institution-level accreditation status granted by one of six U.S. regional accrediting bodies. Accreditation by more than one regional accrediting body is not permitted by the U.S. Department of Education.

University of Newcastle is accredited by the DETC Higher Learning Commission (DETC), www.detc.org.uk Since , University of Newcastle has been continually accredited by the DETC Higher Learning Commission and its predecessor.

Medicine and Surgery MBChB Graduate Entry Course

Course Level:

Postgraduate, Taught, Undergraduate, Single Honours

Credits 

120

Course

CODE U514

How long it takes:

Undergraduate (4 years)

Study Mode:

Distance learning/ Campus

Course cost

Price: US$20,220

Entry requirements

Find out more about

Department:

Newcastle Law School

Modules in the first year

This phase begins with a programme covering biological sciences, anatomy and medicine in society, since you will have covered little of these in comparison with your knowledge of other life science subjects. 

The following must be taken:

  • 20 credits – Cells and Cancer
  • 20 credits – Clinical Competencies
  • 20 credits – Supply and Demand
  • 20 credits -Threats and Defence
  • 20 credits – Thinking and Doing
  • 20 credits – Loss and Renewal
  • 20 credits – Fuel
  • Non-credit bearing – Complex Issues
  • Non-credit bearing – Basic Life Support
  • Non-credit bearing – Year 2 Hospital Preparation Course

  


Modules in the second year

You will be based in the same Teaching Hospital Trusts that currently teach the third-year course for students on the five-year MBChB, spending the first semester in one teaching Trust and rotating to another in the second. 

The following must be taken:

  • 110 credits – Clinical Core 2 – hospital based medicine and surgery, clinical sciences (including pathology, clinical chemistry, haematology, microbiology, infections and clinical immunology), Community Based Medicine
  • 10 credits – Evidence Based Medicine and Research methods
  • 10 credits – Health Improvement Evidence Review (HIER)
  • Non-credit bearing – Professional Development Activities
  • Non-credit bearing – Clinical Procedural Skills 

   


Modules in the third year

Third and fourth year: you will now move onto clinical attachments with attachments in medical, surgical and other speciality subjects, such as Cardiology, Neurology, Psychiatry, Bone and Joint Disease, Oncology, Ear, Nose and Throat and Peri-Operative Care. You will also do attachments in Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Paediatrics and General Practice.

The following must be taken:

  • 130 credits – Clinical Core 3 – Speciality Medicine, Surgery and perioperative care, psychiatry and neurology, Community Based Medicine
  • 10 credits – Learning and teaching
  • 10 credits – Conference Poster Presentation
  • Non-credit bearing – Clinical Procedural Skills
  • Non-credit bearing – Elective preparation

  


Modules in the fourth year

During the final year, you will be able to bring all of your learning and skills together through the Acutely Ill Patient attachment, as you prepare to become a medical practitioner.

The following must be taken:

  • 10 credits – Ethics and Law in Clinical Practice: a reflective case study
  • Non-credit bearing – Prescribing Safety Assessment (PSA)
  • Non-credit bearing – Written Professional Communication
  • Non-credit bearing – Clinical Procedural Skills
  • Non-credit bearing – Immediate Life Support
  • 120 credits – Clinical Core 4
  • Non-credit bearing – Selected Career Experience
  • Non-credit bearing – Student Assistantship
  • Non-credit bearing – Elective and Report

In addition, although this is not a module, you also complete an Elective and a SCE Report, and sit an SJT exam.

You will also have rotations of Obstetric & Gynacology, Paediatrics, Community Based Medicine and Acutely Ill Patient placements as part of the Clinical Core Module.

Entry requirements

 

Applicants should normally have one of the following:

  • A non-law bachelor’s degree (from a UK university or recognised by the BSB if you wish to study the BPTC), or
  • A ‘stale’ law degree, where five or more years have elapsed since graduation, or
  • An academic or professional qualification at degree equivalent level

If English is not your first language, you will also need to demonstrate your English Language proficiency. For example, you should have IELTS 7.5 overall with a minimum of 6.5 in all components.

If you intend to become a Solicitor

The Solicitors Regulation Authority has reduced its requirements for pre-authorisation this year. For details of the current arrangements, see the SRA website. You should pay special attention to the Character and Suitability section. If you think you may have a character or suitability issue, you may wish to clarify with the SRA before proceeding with the GDL.

See further details of our English Language requirement

USA,UK & EU students, 2019/20 (per year)

£8,500

International students starting 2019/20 (per year)

£13,100

 

Assessment

You’ll show your progress through a combination of written essays, problem-solving assignments and presentations.

All students take our core modules, but please note that the availability of optional modules is subject to demand.

As a Newcastle Medical School graduate, you will thrive in the workplace as you to apply your knowledge and skills to ensure that patients are cared for safely, effectively and with compassion.

Whether you have a clear idea of where your future aspirations lie or want to consider the broad range of opportunities available once you have a Newcastle degree, Newcastle Medical School and our outstanding Careers Network can help you achieve your goal.

After graduating from Newcastle Medical School and completing two foundation years, you’ll be in a position to apply for posts in your chosen speciality. For most of our graduates, these are hospital and primary care posts in the NHS, however there are also opportunities in laboratory-based disciplines, research and commercial fields such as the pharmaceutical industry, politics and medical journalism and the media.

At the end of your undergraduate course you will receive your MBChB degree, which is a primary medical qualification (PMQ). Holding a PMQ entitles you to provisional registration with the General Medical Council, subject to its acceptance that there are no Fitness to Practise concerns that need consideration. Find out more about the General Medical Council registration and licensing.

The GMC has introduced a Medical Licensing Assessment – the MLA – for all students graduating from 2024 onwards to demonstrate that those who obtain registration with a licence to practise medicine in the UK meet a common threshold for safe practice. Applicants should be aware that to obtain registration with a licence to practise, medical students will need to pass both parts of the MLA, pass university finals and demonstrate their fitness to practise.

An advantage you will have as a Newcastle student is access to our unique careers guidance service where we help you to develop your career from the moment you arrive. Working closely with academics, alumni, Royal Colleges and the NHS, Careers Network focus on providing you with advice and guidance on the recruitment process for both the Foundation and Academic Foundation Programmes, including support with applications and interview preparation. 

In addition, our employer-endorsed award-winning Personal Skills Award (PSA) recognises your extra-curricular activities, and provides an accredited employability programme designed to improve your career prospects.

   

Professional Accreditation

Our graduates are entitled to provisional registration with the General Medical Council, with a licence to practise, subject to demonstrating to the GMC that their fitness to practise is not impaired.