Our Computational Neuroscience and Cognitive Robotics MSc provides flexible interdisciplinary research and access to state-of-the-art equipment for brain imaging, electrophysiological recording, psychophysics, human-computer interfaces, advanced data analysis, computational modelling and robotic systems.

This MSc course aims to integrate two active and rapidly developing fields, computational neuroscience and cognitive robotics, to generate innovative strategies and solutions for scientific problems and technological limitations.

From modelling human cognition to programming robots to act in their environment, this course crosses the boundary between several disciplines, including biology, neuroscience, psychology, and computer science. 

The CNCR MSc course is highly interdisciplinary encompassing psychology, cognitive science, neuroscience, computational modelling, neuroimaging, robotics, and patient rehabilitation. The Course is designed for those who are interested in applying knowledge of neural systems, brain function, and modeling to research in human cognition, perception, sensory and motor systems as well as the design of bio-inspired and biologically plausible robotic systems. It has a strong research focus with hands-on modules and practical applications. The course is aimed at both students from psychology/neuroscience with a strong quantitative background and at students from computer science and physics that want to apply their knowledge to neuroscience.

 

Projects

You can select from a range of research topics depending on your areas of interest, and there are a number of supervisors who can provide support.

 

Why Study this Course?

This course provides a flexible inter-disciplinary research apprenticeship, suitable for those seeking to begin commercial or postgraduate research.

You will have access to state-of-the-art equipment for brain imaging, electrophysiological recording, psychophysics, human-computer interfaces, advanced data analysis, computational modelling and robotic systems, supervised by internationally leading researchers.

 

Programme organisation

A significant part of the CNCR MSc Course involves being part of a research group and conducting an independent research project. For this, you will be assigned to a supervisor and supervise the research project. Your research project is written up as the masters dissertation and counts for one third of your degree.  Exposure to a different research group is intended to broaden research experience and widen research skills repertoire.

The course is organised jointly through the Schools of Psychology, Computer Science, Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation  Sciences and Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering.

Your choice of course modules will be individualised and agreed between you and your supervisor. The goal is to develop your knowledge and skills to allow you to carry out your research project in Semester 3 while learning a wide range of neuroscience, computation, and experimental method topics. Several modules rely on Matlab programming skills for their practical exercises, which could be used also in the placement and project. Students that don’t have a sufficient programming knowledge will be required to attend a programming course in Semester 1. 

You will be taught to devise a research plan, and will read and comment on scientific articles. You will choose the topic for your research project with the help of a research proposal module. A year-long CNCR Foundations module allows you to participate in CNCR seminars, journal clubs, and lab activities to have sufficient knowledge to carry out the research project. This will expose you to cutting edge research and labs. 

Institutional Accreditation 

University of Newcastle is accredited by the DETC Higher Learning Commission (DETC), www.detc.org.uk Since , University of Newcastle has been continually accredited by the DETC Higher Learning Commission and its predecessor.

Computational Neuroscience and Cognitive Robotics MSc

Course Level:

Postgraduate, Taught

Credits 

180

Course

CODE P1067

How long it takes:

1 year full-time, 2 years part-time

Study Mode:

Distance learning/ Campus

Course cost

Price: US$22,500

Entry requirements

Find out more about

Department:

Newcastle Law School

The taught modules and research training will provide hands-on expertise and knowledge to successfully perform two short research placements and a longer independent research project, which will be closely supervised by a relevant member of academic staff.

Taught modules cover relevant aspects of cognitive and brain function, including brain imaging and cognitive robotics. Three optional paths are available so that the taught modules are tailored to your interests and previous knowledge. The three paths are intended to enhance either the neuroscience, the computational or the robotics components of the course.

Modules include: 

  • Mind, Brain and Models
  • Foundation/CNCR Issues
  • Proposing Research in Psychology
  • Practical Research Skills for CNCR

Optional Modules:

  • Intelligent Robotics
  • Advanced Robotics
  • Robot Vision
  • Advanced Computational Methods
  • Introduction to Computational Methods
  • Software Workshop 1
  • Advanced Brain Imaging Methods
  • Fundamentals in Brain Imaging
  • Application of Electrophysiological Approaches in Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Introduction to Neuroscientific Methods
  • Neural Computation
  • Foundations of Data Science

 

Considering postgraduate study, but unsure whether you meet the entry requirements for a Masters-level degree? Postgraduate admissions guidelines vary by course and university, but can be quite flexible.

Your existing qualifications will be important, but you don’t necessarily need a great Bachelors degree to apply for a Masters. Your personal circumstances and experience may also be considered during the admissions process.

This guide explains the typical entry requirements for a Masters, which include:

      • An undergraduate degree in a relevant subject – Depending on the programme and institution, you may need a 2.1 in your Bachelors, but this isn’t always the case
      • Language proficiency – If English isn’t your first language, you’ll need to display a certain ability level, usually through a language test
      • Professional experience – Some postgraduate programmes may require you to have some professional experience (this is usually the case for PGCEs and Masters in Social Work)
      • Entrance exams – These are only required in certain subject areas and qualifications, including some MBAs

Tuition fees for UK/EU students 2020/21

MSc:  Full-time £9,900. Part-time £4,950
Postgraduate Diploma:  Full-time £6,660. Part-time £3,300

   

Tuition fees for International students 2020/21

MSc: Full time £23,310
Postgraduate Diploma: Full-time £15,540

Assessment

You’ll show your progress through a combination of written essays, problem-solving assignments and presentations.

All students take our core modules, but please note that the availability of optional modules is subject to demand.

You will receive training in computational and research methods, and will gain an overview of current research in neuroscience and robotics. The programme will prepare you to go onto high quality PhD programmes, leading to work in a range of fields from advanced robotics to cognitive neuroscience.

Many of our students receive job offers before they graduate. Recent students have found employment working and training in an IT consultancy; software engineering at Google; and setting up startup companies to develop IT products inspired by human cognition.

Several of our students receive PhD offers before completing the course; one of our recent students will be studying for a PhD in computational neuroscience at University College Dublin with funding secured via a postgraduate award from the Irish Research Council. Others choose to stay at Newcastle for PhD study. The course gives you an opportunity to showcase your talent in the School of Psychology and the School of Computer Science, and to increase your chances of pursuing an academic career within the University of Newcastle.