We offer research-led teaching at the intersection of International Relations, Political Psychology and Security Studies, combined with a 5-day training programme in ‘Trust, Diplomacy and Conflict Transformation’.

  

We live in an age where there is an urgent need for cooperative responses to address major global security challenges, as well as to transform intractable inter-state and intrastate conflicts.  This programme responds to that need by providing students with an advanced interdisciplinary training in the theory and practice of global cooperation and conflict resolution. 

Our MSc degree explores the theory and practice of how individuals, states, and political institutions manage conflict, and develop cooperation in international relations. The programme considers how political communities with different values, cultures, histories, and security conceptions can build trust in a global system.

You will gain a multidisciplinary understanding of key global security challenges (e.g. climate change, nuclear proliferation, transnational terrorism, and intractable conflicts inside and across state borders) and cover debates in International Relations, Political Psychology and Security Studies.

Topics and issues examined include:

  • The Security Dilemma
  • Face-to-face diplomacy
  • Peace building, alliances and institutions
  • Emotions in crises and conflicts
  • The psychology of radicalization, terrorism, and political violence
  • Identities of religion, gender, and nationalism
  • Game theory: the Prisoner’s Dilemma
  • The risks of nuclear war during the Cold War
  • US-Iran nuclear relations
  • The possibilities for avoiding a new Cold War with China

Our MSc degree has one more distinctive feature: it is offered by the Institute for Conflict, Cooperation and Security (ICCS), a world-leading interdisciplinary research centre, in partnership with the Department of Political Science and International Studies. The ICCS has strong connections to high level practitioner networks, which offer summer internship opportunities. Our MSc students can also become members of the four ICCS Research Working Groups: Trust; Political Settlements; International Political Psychology; Unmanned and Remote-Piloted Systems.

Institutional Accreditation 

University of Newcastle is accredited by the DETC Higher Learning Commission (DETC), www.detc.org.uk Since , University of Newcastle has been continually accredited by the DETC Higher Learning Commission and its predecessor.

MSc Global Cooperation and Security

Course Level:

Postgraduate, Taught

Credits 

180

Course

CODE P1117

How long it takes:

1 year full-time; 2 years part-time

Study Mode:

Distance learning/ Campus

Course cost

Price: US$22,500

Entry requirements

Find out more about

Department:

Newcastle Law School

Our students can follow a flexible programme with a wide choice of modules (part-time students are also welcome). In addition to our three core modules, we encourage students to take our new optional module in the Political Psychology of Conflict and Cooperation. Overall, our programme offers interdisciplinary training focused on the role of values, emotions, and beliefs in shaping the possibilities of conflict, cooperation and security at the international level.

 

Compulsory core modules

Dissertation

MSc students to submit a 13,500 word dissertation (not applicable to Diploma Students)
60 credits

  

Fear, Cooperation and Trust in World Politics (20 credits)

In this cutting-edge module, our students develop an informed appreciation of how fear, cooperation and trust shape the contours of world politics. The module explores the obstacles to building cooperation and trust, using a series of case studies. It also investigates whether these obstacles can be overcome through institutions, norms, and personal diplomacy between leaders. A key focus of the module is to introduce students to trust-building strategies and techniques, including the potential for face-to-face diplomacy to build trust and transform conflicts. The module is taught through interactive role-play scenarios in which students take on the role of policy advisors and diplomats in crisis and multilateral negotiation situations (for example, the Cuban Missile Crisis, US-China relations, nuclear non-proliferation, and global climate change).

 

Global Cooperation in Practice (20 credits)

This advanced module provides our students with the skills to understand and explain how the rule of law, institutionalisation, and governance creates structures under which cooperation can flourish. It examines how academic debates on cooperation and policy-making stand up against the actual experience of implementation. The module explores this issue by identifying models of policy and decision-making, and then testing them against practitioner experience. This will entail an examination of case study evidence derived from primary sources (communiques, memoirs, documentaries) and will draw upon policy cases from multilateral settings, including formal international organisations such as the United Nations, the European Union, and NATO.

 

Trust, Diplomacy and Conflict Transformation (20 credits)

This exclusive module is offered as a unique 5-day training programme which provides students with the opportunity to learn directly from specialists about the complexities and nuances of different approaches to conflict transformation in International Relations. The training programme equips our students with the advanced skills to understand how high-level practitioners wrestle with the dilemmas of trust/mistrust in their practical negotiating settings.

The module offers:

  • Practical training in communication and mediation skills
  • Specialist lectures with internationally-renowned academics
  • Networking with high level practitioners in the field of conflict resolution
  • Professional development though a Harvard role play simulation game

Optional Modules

You can choose an additional 60 credits of modules

 

All modules are 20 credits and are available as options on postgraduate taught POLSIS programmes where the module is not compulsory.

 
International relations theory  Governing British Capitalism International Political Economy
Globalisation and Governance Diplomacy and Statecraft Diplomatic History
Security Studies US foreign and defence policy Developments in Contemporary Political Analysis
Radical Social Theory  Politics and the State Rising Powers and Global Order
Global Environmental Governance Terrorism and Political Violence Sex, Death Gender and (in)security
Gender and Global Governance Ethnic Conflict and its management: theories and cases Politics of Arab-Isreali conflict
Varieties of Politics Arguing against Tyranny Problems in Contemporary Political Theory
Dilemmas in International Relations Authoritarianism and Development [IDD]* Democracy and Development [IDD]*
Fear, Cooperation and Trust in World Politics Global Cooperation in Practice Political Psychology of Conflict and Cooperation
Asian Pacific Security Post-conflict Peacebuilding and the International Order

Considering postgraduate study, but unsure whether you meet the entry requirements for a Masters-level degree? Postgraduate admissions guidelines vary by course and university, but can be quite flexible.

Your existing qualifications will be important, but you don’t necessarily need a great Bachelors degree to apply for a Masters. Your personal circumstances and experience may also be considered during the admissions process.

This guide explains the typical entry requirements for a Masters, which include:

      • An undergraduate degree in a relevant subject – Depending on the programme and institution, you may need a 2.1 in your Bachelors, but this isn’t always the case
      • Language proficiency – If English isn’t your first language, you’ll need to display a certain ability level, usually through a language test
      • Professional experience – Some postgraduate programmes may require you to have some professional experience (this is usually the case for PGCEs and Masters in Social Work)
      • Entrance exams – These are only required in certain subject areas and qualifications, including some MBAs

Tuition fees for UK/EU students 2020/21

MSc:  Full-time £9,900. Part-time £4,950
Postgraduate Diploma:  Full-time £6,660. Part-time £3,300

   

Tuition fees for International students 2020/21

MSc: Full time £23,310
Postgraduate Diploma: Full-time £15,540

Assessment

You’ll show your progress through a combination of written essays, problem-solving assignments and presentations.

All students take our core modules, but please note that the availability of optional modules is subject to demand.

Our MSc students can pursue exciting and stimulating career opportunities with a range of organisations including government agencies, international organisations, the armed forces, NGOs, think-tanks, the media, the political world, and multinational corporations. Our excellent academic training is complemented by networking opportunities and voluntary work placements either at the Institute for Conflict, Cooperation and Security (ICCS) itself, or at one of our partner organisations. All our placements are offered on a competitive basis, over the summer term for a maximum of 20 days in order to allow sufficient time for the completion of your dissertation. These include:

 

Institute for Conflict, Cooperation and Security (ICCS)

Our four research-focused working groups invite applications for summer placements in the following areas:

  • Trust
  • Political Settlements
  • International Political Psychology
  • Unmanned and Remote-Piloted Systems

 

Alumni Profiles

Brittany Atkinson, Graduate Fellow with the US National Nuclear Security Administration

The course was all around excellent. I particularly enjoyed the five-day training programme, opportunity to complete a work placement, and the module diversity. The degree has helped me make a major career change. Following the degree, I am now pursuing a career that I am passionate about in national security.”

 

Ellen Moser, Research Associate

What attracted me to this course in particular was the fact that it balances theory with practice, which makes it quite unique compared to other courses which focus nearly exclusively on a theoretical approach.  

 

Hannah Keogh, Junior Caseworker for an MP

I really enjoyed studying under the real leaders in my field. The course was assessed in  a varied way, without too much emphasis on exams, which I believe allowed me to strengthen skills which would be more useful professionally.

 

Juweria Ali, Doctoral Researcher

One of the really interesting things about this masters programme was that we were taught by internationally recognised academics, we also had experts and practitioners on the topics we were studying come in and actually lead our seminars; for instance, Jamie Shea (Deputy Assistant Secretary for Emerging Security Challenges) from NATO.

 

European Leadership Network

The European Leadership Network (ELN) was originally formed to help create the conditions for a world without nuclear weapons. It works on that agenda through its research, events programme and active network of former European political, military, and diplomatic leaders. The ELN carries out its work by producing and disseminating independent research and analysis, and by providing an independent platform for international dialogue and debate with a strong focus on workable and credible policy solutions. Its activities are currently structured around three areas: Global Security, Euro-Atlantic Security and the Middle East.

 

British American Security Information Council (BASIC)

BASIC’s vision is a world free from the threat of nuclear weapons, established by a cooperative global security agenda and formalized in negotiated treaties. BASIC seeks to engage diverse perspectives and broaden the scope of the discussion to find ways past existing frustrations. The organisation has 27 years of experience building an extensive and diverse network across Europe, the US and the Middle East. BASIC has a reputation for non-partisan, non-judgmental engagement and for seeking common ground, in the interests of nuclear disarmament.